Do you have the whole customer journey picture or does it need to be x-rayed?

 

Isn’t this Nick Veasey photograph amazing! Using x-ray technology he creates interesting details beyond the surface of the objects and people. As we start to pair up x-rays with artificial intelligence and patient general history, the improvements in medicine will be tremendous. Can you say the same about your service? Do you know just the surface details or deeply understand your complete customer experience?

 

Let’s talk about

  • The X-Ray Artist – Nick Veasey
  • Surface versus deep customer understanding

Nick Veasey

English artist Nick Veasey leverages radiographic imaging equipment to create amazing photographic images.  How did this all start? Assigned to x-ray soda cans to find a code inside for a TV/Pepsi promotions, he accidentally x-rayed his sneakers and thought it would make interesting art. After perfecting his methods, he has successfully created artwork around the world. And this deeper level of detail reminds us to think about the layers of service too!

Surface versus deep understanding

Even today, X-ray technology has been an essential. But then, there is the future. As reported in the New York Times Article, “Using AI to Transform Breast Cancer Care” by Susan Guber, Oct. 24, 2019, studies are underway to pair the x-ray both with patient history information and better x-ray analysis. Maybe it’s time to go beyond the surface and x-ray what you do and do not do for your customers.

Online feedback forms will not help you measure customers that just never choose to come back because your process is just too difficult or confusing.

  • At Starbucks, do individuals know the status of their order or do that have to stand around guessing? Just not knowing can be very annoying.
    • Why not have a display screen so that customers can know when their order is ready or in process?
  • At McDonalds, is it really clear how it all works with the self-ordering process? Is there even anyone around to explain? Again, quietly annoying.
    • Why not have some sort of audio at the kiosk board or some interesting way to let new customers know the new steps?
  • Some self-order casual dining models have nice tables set up and no signs at all about self-ordering. So, new customers end up just sitting down. And, isn’t it all wrong to have elderly couples trying to carry their own wine glasses and water to their table.
    • Why not have some signage? And maybe offer to bring drinks for customers that need the extra help?

Sensors and measuring it all!

Take a minute to decide what should happen with each customer and then decide if you can really know about all those details from just the online feedback. Don’t let those disappointed customer leave and never come back. Decide on a better customer experience and make sure you know it’s in place all the time.

Then, if you think you need a more comprehensive deep dive study, let us help you create a mystery shopping program! Sensors are not going to capture it all. Sometimes you just need real people to go in and tell you what happened. We’re ready to help!

Mary Furrie, CEO, Quality Assessments Mystery Shoppers, helping companies understand their fine details of service!

Photo from:  https://www.art-madrid.com/en/post/curiosidad-rayos-x-y-arte-newnew